Reflejos
"Whoever does not move among works of art as if among dangerous animals does not know among what he moves." - Nicolás Gómez Dávila
poboh:

A girl reading in a hammock, Robert Archibalt Graafland. Dutch (1875 - 1940)

poboh:

A girl reading in a hammock, Robert Archibalt Graafland. Dutch (1875 - 1940)

poboh:

 Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida, Spanish Realist, Impressionist Painter (1863 - 1923) Siesta in the Garden, 1904. 

poboh:

 Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida, Spanish Realist, Impressionist Painter (1863 - 1923) Siesta in the Garden, 1904. 

poboh:

Young Woman at Hammock, Henri Lebasque. French (1865 - 1937)

poboh:

Young Woman at Hammock, Henri Lebasque. French (1865 - 1937)

poboh:

Irving Ramsey Wiles.  American (1861–1948)

poboh:

Irving Ramsey Wiles. American (1861–1948)

cavetocanvas:

Theodor Kittelsen, Self Portrait

cavetocanvas:

Theodor Kittelsen, Self Portrait

artgalleryofontario:

The Hammock, 1880 James Tissot (French) Print, etching and drypoint on laid paper, 27.8 x 18.4 cm Gift of Allan and Sondra Gotlieb, 1994

artgalleryofontario:

The Hammock, 1880
James Tissot (French)
Print, etching and drypoint on laid paper, 27.8 x 18.4 cm
Gift of Allan and Sondra Gotlieb, 1994

Wendell Berry - The peace of wild things
When despair grows in me
and I wake in the middle of the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children's lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting for their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.

“Can you say,” I once inquired of a sixty-year-old cloistered nun who had lived (vibrantly, it seemed) from the age of nineteen in her monastery cell, “what the core of contemplative life is?”

“Leisure,” she said without hesitation, her china blue eyes cheerfully steady on me. I suppose I expected her to say, “Prayer.” Or maybe “The search for God.” Or “Inner peace.” Inner peace would have been good. One of the big-ticket items of spirituality.

She saw I didn’t see.

“It takes time to do this,” she said finally.

Her “this” being the kind of work that requires abdication from time’s industrial purpose (doing things, getting things). By choosing leisure she had bid farewell to the fevered enterprise of getting-and-spending whereby, as the poet said, we lay waste our powers.

—  

Patricia HamplBlue Arabesque: A Search for the Sublime

(via wesleyhill)

alongtimealone:

Henri Lebasque (French, 1865-1937)  
Young Woman on a Hammock, 1923
(by *Huismus)

alongtimealone:

Henri Lebasque (French, 1865-1937)  

Young Woman on a Hammock, 1923

(by *Huismus)

Matisse.

Matisse.

Henri Matisse - Woman in a Purple Coat, 1937, in situ at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts
The artist was born on Dec. 31, 1869, the son of a grain merchant in Le Cateau in Picardy. The law had been chosen as his profession, and it took some persuasion over parental objections for Matisse to begin the art studies he yearned for. In Paris he studied under Gustave Moreau, and from 1893 to 1896 he produced sober still lifes and other quiet pictures influenced by Chardin and Corot. He copied old masters in the Louvre, earning his way through his schooling. In later years, telling about it, he said, “One must learn to walk firmly on the ground before one tries the tightrope.” - NY Times Obituary

Henri Matisse - Woman in a Purple Coat, 1937, in situ at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts

The artist was born on Dec. 31, 1869, the son of a grain merchant in Le Cateau in Picardy. The law had been chosen as his profession, and it took some persuasion over parental objections for Matisse to begin the art studies he yearned for. In Paris he studied under Gustave Moreau, and from 1893 to 1896 he produced sober still lifes and other quiet pictures influenced by Chardin and Corot. He copied old masters in the Louvre, earning his way through his schooling. In later years, telling about it, he said, “One must learn to walk firmly on the ground before one tries the tightrope.” - NY Times Obituary